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Labyrinth as Life

The labyrinth, made by the architect Daedalus to house the Minotaur -- a beast which is the offspring of King Menos's wife Pasiphae, and a divine bull sent from the Gods -- is in fact a metaphor for life. Daedalus also crafted the wooden bull that Pasiphae climbed into to help allure the divine bull. Theseus would go on to kill the Minotaur with the help of Ariadne's thread, which helped guide him back through the labyrinth. The Minotaur represents DEATH and the fear we may experience while contemplating the matter. The fear coming from the unknown.

Beliefs of the afterlife are either based on faith or logic.

The entrance to the labyrinth is birth, and the winding, circular path is the journey of life.  Death is inevitable. The route of the labyrinth is just in between time.

Consider a labyrinth and how it relates to your life. By considering it death will be explored, and maybe lose some of it's fear. A labyrinth features a strong orientation point, a path and an opening. For me, these days, the orientation point is an ashtray outside of the school of music which is home to barely smoked, deposited cigars, which I frequent during times of strife or celebration. It is no coincidence that The Game of Troy was preformed in ancient times, which is a dance that reenacts the labyrinth, at funerals and founding of cities. The ashtray acts as pivot on which my world swirls. By humbling (or degrading) myself by taking the cigar and smoking it, I am in fact acquainting myself with death: "Hi death." "Hello." 

Although no religions per se have been dedicated to the labyrinth there has been a spiritual movement based on it. And at Chartres cathedral in France a marble tile labyrinth is the floor, which pilgrims journeyed upon arrival, or tourists journey as a pilgramage.

When thinking of labyrinths, and their associations with life and death, I cannot help but think of my new religion: "The New Tunnel Religion." The similarities are there, except in my opinion the tunnel is more optimistic, and it doesn't fool you into believing there is no end. Instead of a beast waiting for you, there is instead a new world. That, of course, could be a disadvantage, especially if there happen to be not one, but a great many beasts waiting to maul and chase you, and poke you with their furry fingers all while laughing merrily.

Death may not be so bad at all. According to Maurice Maeterlinck, who uses logic in relation to the after life lists four possibilities, outside of the religions, of the afterlife: total annihilation; survival with our consciousness of today; survival without any sort of consciousness; lastly, survival with universal consciousness different from that which we possess in this world." He chooses the last option as most plausible, and compares it to a "sea of bliss".

Well, whatever death may be, it wouldn't hurt to acquaint ourselves with it, so as to appease the possible dread, or merry making- if you are looking forward to it.

13 comments:

dogimo said...

I'll have to check out that Maeterlinck cat. What he counts most plausible, I'd like to see how he backs that up. Surely, annihilation - as requiring nothing - would be the most plausible. I'd have thought. Interesting.

But man, Daedalus always struck me as pretty pathetic. What kind of dude puts his wife in a fake bull? For...that to happen?

John Dantzer said...

Maybe you thought Daedalus was pathetic because of his representation in Hercules?

I'll try finding the book I got Maeterlinck's idea from and post it.

dogimo said...

I'm not familiar with his treatment in Hercules. No, just his whole management of the Pasiphae-bull incident. Seems like he wasn't really helping her out any on that one.

John Dantzer said...

Pasiphae fell in love with the divine ox, as it was sent from the gods and probably well hung. And women love well hung. So she wanted to do the bull, and so got Daedalus, unbeknownst to her husband, the King of Minos, to make her a wooden bull. She wanted it! Wanted it bad! A love child gone wrong. I'll admit, the greek legends were strange... Of a different time. Maybe no one thought twice about bestiality back then.

dogimo said...

Yeah, but I'm just saying - that's one commission where he should have passed. No matter how good an artificer you are, when the King's wife comes to you and says she wants you to make her a false cow to hide inside for bull-seduction purposes, you've got to turn that job down. That's not to your credit or hers.

John Dantzer said...

He was a prisoner of the city and so had to do it.
Anyway, maybe that was the thing to do back then. Anything divine is humpable.

dogimo said...

I don't know man, that's like saying the queen could tell him to murder the king, and he's a prisoner of the city he has to do it. He doesn't have to help the queen cheat on the king with livestock - prisoner or no, there's got to be some wiggle room there.

dogimo said...

AW, SHIT!!! You meant the classic "The Mighty Hercules" - not the Disney version! Well, I might well have some half-subconscious buried grudge then. I used to love that show!

HERCULES! Only the EVIL FEAR HIM, Herc-ules...!

That's probably the root of my whole beef with the guy. Sorry about all that!

John Dantzer said...

Yeah, I should have been more specific. It is a classic, especially the song. The cartoon was trying too hard to appeal to the masses, and the animators may be the laziest of all time.

You have a point, he could have said no, but he also murdered his sister. He wasn't the best guy, but I wouldn't describe him as pathetic.

dogimo said...

The thing I always loved about that theme is how high the dude's voice is who sings it - and how rich and plummy his enunciation!

John Dantzer said...

Yeah, just like in Thor how the narrator says evil. He really pounds on the "e", and draws out the "il" like by saying evil it really is evil.

Asylum Dolly said...

Loads of food for thought for my hungry mind there! I get confused when I think about this kinda life and death stuff. The whole "sea of bliss" idea sounds nice. Idealistic, but nice. I'm not religious in any way shape or form, but I do believe in spirits and such....
For now I'm going to stick with your tunnel religion :)

John Dantzer said...

I also believe in spirits. They guide my darts when I am throwing them, weather they are poisonous or not.

I am glad you are faithful to the tunnel.